Ask me anything about MO BIO or science!

My name is Jeremy, and I work at an awesome company called MO BIO Laboratories, located in sunny Carlsbad, CA. This is a blog of the amazing things going on in the life sciences as well as a peek into the strange and eccentric life of our Marketing Department. These views are mine and mine alone. Likes, reblogs, and comments are greatly appreciated.

Working with the 3 S's in Mind:

Science, Spin Filters, and Starbucks

Farewell MO BIO!

This will be my last post as part of MO BIO Laboratories. I’m moving back home to be closer to my family in San Francisco. (Well, I’ve actually been home for close to two months already because this post is at the end of my extremely long queue). It’s been fun discovering, learning, and reblogging all the cool stuff happening in the life sciences. And it’s be a pleasure working for such an amazing company. I hope all my followers have enjoyed my posts over the course of JeremyMOBIO’s short existence. Keep blogging about science and tumblr on!

1 year ago
0 notes
sciencephotolibrary:


Shigella bacteria. Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Shigella sp. Bacteria (red) on the surface of a cell. Shigella sp. are Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria (bacilli) and are the causative agent of human shigellosis. They infect the large intestine and cause dysentery, which can vary in severity from a mild attack of diarrhoea to an acute infection.

Credit: SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

sciencephotolibrary:

Shigella bacteria. Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Shigella sp. Bacteria (red) on the surface of a cell. Shigella sp. are Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria (bacilli) and are the causative agent of human shigellosis. They infect the large intestine and cause dysentery, which can vary in severity from a mild attack of diarrhoea to an acute infection.

Credit: SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

(via medical-lab-minds)

1 year ago
62 notes

PAPER ACCEPTED

whatshouldwecallgradschool:

credit: Redwineonawhitebed

1 year ago
44 notes

WHEN SOMEONE ASKS ME HOW IM DOING AFTER IVE BEEN IN THE LAB FOR 12 HOURS STRAIGHT

whatshouldwecallgradschool:

Murder

credit: Danielle

1 year ago
76 notes
geneticist:

A fairy ring is a naturally occurring ring of mushrooms. They are also known as pixie’s rings, faerie circles, or elf circles. The English believed that fairy rings were where fairies came to dance and celebrate, the mushrooms of the rings were used as stools for the fairies to recuperate during the evenings festivities. (OP)

geneticist:

A fairy ring is a naturally occurring ring of mushrooms. They are also known as pixie’s rings, faerie circles, or elf circles. The English believed that fairy rings were where fairies came to dance and celebrate, the mushrooms of the rings were used as stools for the fairies to recuperate during the evenings festivities. (OP)

(via geneticist)

1 year ago
143,976 notes
decaturjim:

The Microbiome: The presence and abundance of our invisible residents
It’s been a big week for our microbiomes.
The first phase of an ambitious study to characterise all the bacteria, fungi, and other microbes that reside in our bodies has been completed, with the results published in a series of articles in Nature, PLoS One and Genome Biology.
It’s a significant undertaking as the majority of previous research has focused on only those bugs that can potentially cause disease. The current study hints at the enormous scope of a person’s microbial rainforest while highlighting emerging view that these bugs, both pathogenic and non-pathogenic, actively participate and contribute to our metabolism and are critical for our ongoing health and survival.
To give you a taste of the “complex combinations” of these microbial partners of ours, The New York Times has published this impressive ‘family tree’ illustrating their prevalence and abundance.

decaturjim:

The Microbiome: The presence and abundance of our invisible residents

It’s been a big week for our microbiomes.

The first phase of an ambitious study to characterise all the bacteria, fungi, and other microbes that reside in our bodies has been completed, with the results published in a series of articles in Nature, PLoS One and Genome Biology.

It’s a significant undertaking as the majority of previous research has focused on only those bugs that can potentially cause disease. The current study hints at the enormous scope of a person’s microbial rainforest while highlighting emerging view that these bugs, both pathogenic and non-pathogenic, actively participate and contribute to our metabolism and are critical for our ongoing health and survival.

To give you a taste of the “complex combinations” of these microbial partners of ours, The New York Times has published this impressive ‘family tree’ illustrating their prevalence and abundance.

(via jtotheizzoe)

1 year ago
330 notes

jtotheizzoe:

How speeding up chemical reactions is sort of like getting a date, and five ways that they are a similar sort of match-making.

(via TED-Ed)

1 year ago
116 notes

WHEN SOMEONE INTERRUPTS ME WHEN IM PLATING MY SAMPLES

whatshouldwecallgradschool:

credit: Ben

1 year ago
44 notes

beleagueredpericardium:

Aseptic Techniques

-Prepared Bacterial Cultures in Broth Tubes & on Agar Slants

-Prepared Streak plate

Photos of my prepared inoculated media from last week. Obviously I transferred too much bacteria to the media (otherwise those plate streaks would be really thin and there would be tiny dots - colonies - which there were but only very few). It was ok though since it was the first time I’ve ever done so. What was important was that it wasn’t contaminated by anything other than the desired culture.

Specimens grown are Escherichia coli (E. coli) & Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus)

(Source: puwet, via medical-lab-minds)

1 year ago
6 notes